Bronze Building Plaques-Shinjuku

plaque8-japan.gif
They got ‘em over here too and they’re pretty nice. This one from the Shinjuku neighborhood of Tokyo includes a heavy decorative frame and is about 3-4 times thicker than those seen in SF.

BBP7

plaque7.gif
This is the first one of these that is a direct copy of another, at least the word “Apartment” is the same as the Sutter-Taylor apts. The M & V look like they might be of the same family as the S in Sutter, but Mt. Vernon gets the fancy R. The N is a little odd but the other characters look close enough… did they mix in the R & N from another font, or are they part of an extended series? The bad thing about the Vernon is they used the cheesy blue marbled background which looks like kitchen contact paper. These plaques have separate letters attached to a backing plate–must have been cheaper than the castings.

Bronze Building Plaques

Agatha Apts

This week we’ll be covering water resistant, outdoor, cast bronze building plaques.

The Nob Hill area of San Francisco is full of fine fancy, old specimens and our team of researchers are working tirelessly to share the best of the best with our avid readers around the world.

Water doesn’t stand a chance against these bad boys. When water resistance is required, Bronze is king coupled with good hardness, workability and looks. Bronze is a copper-tin alloy not to be confused with brass, a wimpy copper-zinc compound used for plumbing and shiny marine decorations. You may ask “Why not Stainless Steel?” SS will turn to swiss cheese below the waterline. Without oxygen stainless doesn’t work! Even though these plaques have plenty of oxygen the Victorians didn’t use it because Stainless Steel wasn’t invented yet. Even today SS isn’t the best choice due it’s high cost of material, working difficulty, and lack of bright crowd-pleasing color like our friend Bronze.

Always remember, Bronze is best!